App Center Best Practices – Facebook Developers

Last week, we announced the App Center, a new channel to grow canvas, mobile, and web apps that integrate Facebook. We encourage all developers to submit their app detail page this week. Having an app detail page is required for being listed in the App Center, and it will also become the new destination when non-users search for your app.

We are already reviewing app detail pages for apps that have high enough quality signals to be listed in the App Center. We are impressed with the quality and number of submissions to date. Checkout the impressive app detail pages created by Zuma Blitz, Soundcloud, and Pulse.

We published the App Center guidelines to help you understand what we expect of apps that are listed. In addition, the below checklist highlights some of the most important things to consider when you’re creating your app detail page:

1.) Websites must provide a personalized experience.
When people click through from the App Center, they are logging into your website. As a result, do not present these users with “Login with Facebook” buttons.

All websites and mobile web apps need to immediately present authenticated users with a logged-in experience. Specifically, we’re looking for personalization, such as name and profile picture, so users know that their Facebook information is being used to create an account.

One of the easiest ways to detect user status is to use the JavaScript SDK and the FB.getLoginStatus call on your landing pages. Learn more.

2.) Review your app settings.
App detail pages are dynamic based on the integrations you’ve specified on the basic settings page of the Developer App. Be sure to review this and remove any old or non-functional integrations. If you don’t use Facebook Login on your website, please don’t list it.

For example, if you’re building only an iOS app you shouldn’t have anything in the Site URL, Mobile Web URL or Canvas URL fields.

3.) Provide high-quality images.
Your images should match the quality of your app. As specified in the guidelines, images shouldn’t have buttons, excessive text, borders, dropshadows, URLs, promotions, pricing, or third-party logos.

Icons and promotional banners cannot have a white background, rounded edges or borders. If your logo has rounded corners, please fill the white space in the corners with a color. Also, all promotional banners must include the name of your app.

Screenshots should be screenshots of the actual experience (no additional graphics overlaid, no distorted angles). Feel free to use concept art in your cover image and icons, but please keep it out of screenshots.

4.) Input accurate names & thoughtful descriptions.
Don’t add any additional keywords to the name of your app. For example, if your app is named “Billiards”, don’t submit your name as “Billiards – Pool”.

Proofread your app description for spelling and grammar and remove unnecessary symbols, like stars, hearts and multiple exclamation points.

5.) Don’t forget to save and submit.
We understand that it may take some time to create a great app detail page, so we provide the ability to save your work before submitting. Once you’re done, don’t forget to click the “submit” button at the top of the page.

In the coming weeks, we will be providing additional information about how the localization and translation process will work for app detail pages.

As a reminder, all app detail pages submitted by May 18th will be given prioritized review for the user launch of the App Center. If you haven’t already, create your app detail page today.

Intel Launches ‘Digital Magazine’ Curated by Employees | Digital – Advertising Age

It looks like Flipboard; aggregates and posts content like Reddit; and presents news visually, like Newsmap. And it’s from Intel. Launching today, Intel iQ is a social-publishing platform and the tech giant’s latest content-marketing experiment.

Intel iQ is a new social-publishing platform and the latest content-marketing experiment from the technology giant.

Intel iQ is a new social-publishing platform and the latest content-marketing experiment from the technology giant.

–>

IQ resembles a digital magazine but is curated by Intel employees. A story gets to the iQ front page when a certain number of people recommend it. The goal is to “connect with a younger audience and tell them the bigger story of who we are as a brand,” said Editor-in-Chief Bryan Rhoads. “Many of them don’t know, so we need to tell them the story of Intel that is beyond PCs and beyond processors.”

Mr. Rhoads will sometimes place staff-written or important stories on the page, but most articles will appear democratically and make it on their own merits. On page, each story box appears with a photo and a tag: “IQ Original” for staff-written and freelance-commissioned articles, “iQ Network” for content written by partner companies such as Discovery or Vice, or “Via” for pieces from an outside source. The last tag is followed by the name of the publication, for instance, “via Mashable.”

Bryan Rhoads, editor in chief of Intel iQ

Bryan Rhoads, editor in chief of Intel iQ

–> Each story box grows visually as social media — clicks, shares, freshness, relevancy and other data from around the web — is added.

Stories range in topic from the latest in biometric shirts and the newest Angry Birds game to gamification in the classroom and social’s influence on the rock band Counting Crows. But technology is the stories’ common denominator. The beta site is organized into three main topics: media, life and planet.

“We have Facebook, Twitter and blogs and all of that, but they’re really not tailored to a younger audience,” Mr. Rhoads said, adding that iQ is intended as outreach to that demographic.

Nicknamed “The Blogfather” by his marketing colleagues, Mr. Rhoads is an Intel veteran who has worked on social media since 2006 and is now chief strategist for the Intel Social Media Center of Excellence. He helped launch the company’s brand blogs six years ago and sees Intel iQ as the next logical step. Intel is already a traditional social-media publisher, with 10 million Facebook fans and almost 250,000 Twitter followers.

“This is a new type of social property that is meant to feed social media and content needs,” Mr. Rhoads said. “IQ is not necessarily a destination, but more of an engine and platform to get out into Facebook and Twitter. You don’t have to come to iQ, but you’ll be getting iQ stories in your news feeds and streams.”

Intel has garnered kudos for its social-media policies. It published its employee guidelines online in 2008 and was praised for the progressive edge, high level of trust and minimal restrictions. Currently, there are 160 social-media practitioners at Intel globally who contribute to iQ, and Mr. Rhoads said he expects that number to grow to the “thousands.”

MediaPost Publications The Social Sharing Shortcut To Registration 05/14/2012

According to the current quarterly study by Janrain Engage, across 365,000 websites analyzing social login and social sharing preferences, Facebook is the most popular option at 45%, while a majority would rather use a different social identity, such as Google, Yahoo! or Twitter.

Because the social media landscape is fragmented, notes the report, the study helps to determine which identities people prefer both for sign-in and content sharing that can be used to speed up registration on sites across the web.

People use Facebook to interact with friends and family, Twitter to follow influencers and share opinions, LinkedIn for their professional network, and Gmail, Yahoo! or Hotmail to communicate directly with contacts.  Combined, these networks boast over 1.5 billion accounts. 

Facebook’s share of social logins has increased steadily over the past two years.  While Google’s share declined moderately during the first three quarters of 2011, though overall preference for Google has increased 2% since Q4 2011, with Google+ rapidly scaling users and adoption, says the report.

Social Login Trends

 

Q1 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

35%

45%

Google

31%

31%

Yahoo

13%

9%

Twitter

7%

9%

Windows Live 

6%

3%

Other

8%

3%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

The report says that, as with prior reports, that they have taken a sampling of sites in four industry verticals to measure trends in consumer login preferences.  While the overall story arc is similar, says the report, there are disparate preferences within each vertical. Shown here is a selection of the more complete data available from Janrain.

Media Sites Social Login Trends

 

Q1 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

39%

46%

Google

21%

21%

Yahoo

24%

13%

Twitter

5%

8%

AOL

5%

2%

Other

10%

6%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

 

Retail Sites Social Login Trends

 

Q1 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

50%

43%

Google

22%

29%

Yahoo!

16%

11%

Windows Live

4%

4%

AOL

5%

3%

Twitter

3%

4%

Other

6%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

 

Entertainment & Gaming Sites Social Login Trends

 

Q1 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

42%

50%

Google

20%

21%

Windows Live

11%

4%

Yahoo!

13%

11%

Twitter

5%

9%

Other

9%

5%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

 

Music Sites Social Login Trends

 

Q1 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

47%

63%

Google

17%

13%

Twitter

13%

12%

Windows Live

13%

2%

Yahoo!

6%

6%

Other

4%

4%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

Facebook’s popularity for social login on eCommerce websites has declined moderately from 49% to 43% during the past two quarters. Increasingly, retailers are offering social shopping experiences on their eCommerce sites that leverage a consumer’s Facebook social graph. Yahoo!’s share of social logins on retail sites has plummeted since 2009, mostly due to Google and Facebook.

On media websites, Yahoo! and Google are running strong as the second and third most popular providers.  Despite a modest decline during the past several quarters, Yahoo! continues to perform best in this vertical.  Twitter’s share within this segment has yet to accelerate.

Windows Live (Hotmail/MSN), historically a strong performer on entertainment and gaming sites, has experienced a notable decline in share of social logins during the past year.

On mobile applications, Facebook and Google lead in popularity, followed by Twitter and Yahoo!. Twitter’s improvement in popularity on mobile devices could be a result of its OAuth integration with Apple iOS 5 for social login, which has further socialized mobile users to rely on Twitter as an authentication mechanism on portable devices, opines the report.

Mobile Social Login Trends

 

Q3 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

37%

49%

Google

37%

25%

Yahoo!

12%

9%

Twitter

10%

14%

Other

4%

4%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

More than ever, people are sharing comments, purchases, reviews and other content from the web to their social networks. Facebook and Twitter are far and away the most popular sharing destinations, but Yahoo!, LinkedIn and MySpace maintain preference on niche sites that are catered to their audience (B2B sites for LinkedIn and music sites for MySpace).  During the past two quarters, Twitter’s popularity as a sharing destination has increased at a more prominent rate than other social networks.

Social Sharing Trends

 

Q3 – 2011

Q1 – 2012

Facebook

54%

54%

Twitter

35%

39%

LinkedIn

2%

3%

Yahoo!

 7%

3%

Myspace

2%

1%

Source: Janrain, May 2012

In concluding, the report offers a summary of suggestions for marketers in the use of the data. The author notes that social login shortens the registration process to a single click and provides instant access to rich demographic, psychographic and social graph data on users. This social profile data can be leveraged for content personalization or product recommendations and more tailored segmentation and targeting. Social sharing lets users broadcast content and activities from the marketers site to their social networks, increasing brand advocacy and creating an effective source of qualified referral traffic.

MediaPost Publications Twitter And Facebook: Do You Feel Good Enough To Make A Purchase? 04/04/2012

TwitterBird-AB2Twitter wants feedback on how to improve the site. The company is running a five- to-10-minute multi-question survey to determine user satisfaction. It not only wants to know if and why you would recommend Twitter to a friend, family member or colleague, but also the primary motivation for using the site, and how its ad platforms — Promoted Trends, Promoted Accounts, Promoted Tweets — compare with others.

Does Twitter delight you? Does Twitter feel human? the survey asks. An interesting conversation with Amy Shea, Brand Keys’ EVP, global director of brand development, brought up this concept of brands trying to act human on social sites. Finding human connection means bringing together technology and products to make that connection, which can lead consumers to jump from Twitter, Facebook and other social sites to make a purchase.

With so much talk about attribution, it seems that social networks continue to vie for credit that leads consumers to make a purchase. A study from ExactTarget suggests that 32% of U.K.-based online consumers would be more likely to buy from a company after following it on the social network. Compare this with 24% who would more likely buy after clicking the “like” button on a Facebook brand’s page, and 21% who admit to signing up and responding to email marketing, or even from pin to purchase on Pinterest.

When it comes to Facebook, brands don’t seem to view the ad offering — Sponsored Stories — as a tool to connect with consumers. While some advertisers and marketers might consider the offer a connection, because the messages in the ad directly reflect consumer sentiment, a survey from Social Fresh estimates that only 55% of Facebook advertisers use the tool. 

All Facebook points to The 2012 Facebook Ads Report, where 347 Facebook advertisers admit that return on investment and analytics are the biggest challenges on Facebook. With Twitter’s self-serve ad platform for small and mid-size businesses just kicking off, I’m sure it’s a problem the site would like to do without.

Why Facebook Is Hiring Advertising Agency Creatives

Just in case you were wondering, Facebook is not trying to build an ad agency, despite recent hiring of some of the industry’s creatives.

“Is Facebook building an agency internally, hiring a handful of creative people, starting something that becomes competitive with us?” JWT North America CEO David Eastman asked Facebook VP-Global Marketing Solutions Carolyn Everson on stage at the 4As Transformation Conference in Beverly Hills today.

“You’re thinking of Mark D’Arcy, who is my chief creative partner at Facebook, who we hired a little less than a year ago,” Ms. Everson said. “Mark has hired a handful of people around the world so we can have a conversation with the Jeff Benjamins of the world and chief creative officers.” (Jeff Benjamin being the digital creative JWT recently hired away from CP&B to be chief creative officer of JWT North America and New York.)

“Creatives like talking to creatives,” Ms. Everson said. “We need enough people at Facebook who can sit across the table from a creative leader and engage in a conversation about what the possibilities are.”

She urged the audience to look at how Facebook deals with developers to get a sense of how it would like to deal with ad agencies.

“We’ve been very good at partnering with developers, we had our F8 conference,” which helped developers understand how to create programs and businesses on Facebook’s platform, she said. In an analog to that, “we just had our first FMC (Facebook Marketing Conference).”

Ms. Everson did acknowledge that clients often look to get involved and connect to tech companies directly, rather than rely on their ad agencies to have the relationship. When she was at Viacom’s‘s MTV Networks she had very few direct client relationships, she said. But when she got to Microsoft, “I started to see the plethora of Silicon Valley client tours. … [The thinking was that] if I am a client I better understand how technology is changing consumer consumption or information-sharing,” she said. “That does not mean there’s not a robust role for the agency. As a matter of fact, clients are clamoring for their agencies to be that leader, to take them on the tours.”

Mr. Eastman also asked Ms. Everson about a recent quote (which ran in Ad Age), where an advertiser updated the IT maxim “nobody ever gets fired for buying IBM” to be “nobody will get fired for spending on Facebook.”

Ms. Everson said that rather than looking at who’s not getting fired, she sees marketers who are getting promoted for investing in social. She cited a client at American Express who had an extraordinary ascension because she “made a career decision to understand what was happening in the space … how social could transform the relationship a consumer can have with a financial institution.”

Mr. Eastman also pressed Ms. Everson on social’s ROI. “It’s undeniable that a marketer wants to understand their best customers, their biggest fans who will become their brand advocates. … So the notion of what’s the value of the fan, we have very specific metrics around that — Nielsen and ComScore both studied this. Starbucks know fans spend 8% more when they go into Starbucks. Bing knows that fans do 60% more searches. American Express knows fans spend 28% more on small businesses.”

She urged advertisers to be careful about how they look at fan ROI, so as to not repeat the mistakes the internet industry made in its early days. “The notion that you could know who your best customers are, have a one-to-one relationship and inspire them to become your best advocates — that’s the totality of how we want you to think of this,” she said. “To think about fans as just a number or a click-through, you’re missing the entire piece about what’s the value of a fan. It’s not about how many people necessarily commented, or clicked through. That’s the mistake the digital industry made when it started. What we thought was the most measurable industry has been boiled down to a handful of metrics that really don’t tell you if someone bought your product off the shelf or went to purchase your car.”

Facebook co-founder buys New Republic magazine – Business

(Reuters) – Chris Hughes, one of the co-founders of Facebook and a former online strategist for Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign, has purchased a majority stake in The New Republic, the magazine said on Friday.

Hughes, 28, will become publisher and editor-in-chief of the nearly 100-year old magazine which covers American politics.

He is also expected to apply his expertise in digital technology in his new role.

The New Republic currently publishes a daily Web magazine. The New Republic did not disclose the financial terms of the transaction or the exact size of the stake.

Hughes co-founded Facebook in 2004 at Harvard with his then- roommates Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and Dustin Moskovitz

.

Since working on the Obama campaign Hughes founded Jumo.com in 2010, a non-profit site that aimed to help people find ways to help each other. It was later combined with GOOD in 2011, an online content and social engagement platform.

As well as his new role Hughes will continue to invest independently and work with non-profits like the Knight Foundation.

(Reporting By Yinka Adegoke, editing by Dave Zimmerman)

Copyright 2012 Thomson Reuters. Click for restrictions.

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Facebook’s Brand Timeline Can Be Bridge to the Millennials | CMO Strategy – Advertising Age

Matt Wolfrom

Matt Wolfrom
Matt Makovsky

Matt Makovsky

Facebook’s IPO will be the largest ever for a tech company, and it has every chief executive asking the CMO, “What’s our Facebook strategy?” And with the buzz around the launch of a “brand timeline” at the Facebook Marketing Conference in New York this week, the stakes for lead marketers to deliver results in an increasingly complex environment will grow exponentially.

While the brand timeline will unlock opportunities and also expose risks for many CMOs, we envision a world of possibilities for heritage brands to build connections with millennials.

This generation is the largest, most diverse, educated, affluent, complicated and influential consumer base that CMOs have ever encountered. Even with more than 800 million users, Facebook remains a platform that was created by a millennial, for millennials. With this timeline feature, brands can now interact through a “virtual life story” that is inherently authentic to the brand and its history, on a medium that’s second nature to a generation.

How can heritage brands take advantage of the new timeline? Take Western Union as an example. The company is the largest player in a huge flow of resources -– the transfer of billions of dollars every year involving one-sixth of the world’s population. It has a history of innovation and an entrepreneurial culture. Yet its brand promise, as reflected by its Facebook page today, is lost among negative consumer posts.

The brand timeline will empower CMOs to turn this situation on its head. While negative posts will never disappear, marketers will have a digital canvas on which to create a visually rich, compelling story to engage audiences in a more meaningful way. As research proves, millennials view relationships with brands as a partnership and a form of expression. Once they have formed an opinion, a reverberation affects brand preferences. Facebook’s brand timeline may well be Western Union’s “digital bridge” –- connecting its 160 years of innovation with the previously untapped group of millennials who don’t think much more than “wire transfers” when they consider the brand.

Facebook has been tight-lipped about how the brand timeline will function (first in a trial phase to select marketers), but there are a few key enhancements to the user experience that heritage brands can capitalize on:

Interactive content can be time-stamped from a brand’s inception. Whether it’s the virtual creation in 1973 of the first pair of Nikes or, better yet, the race footage of Prefontaine’s record-setting performances as Nike‘s first sponsored athlete — millennials will be able to experience a brand’s entire digital history on one page.

Everyone is familiar with “likes” on Facebook, but a new brand vernacular is developing. As consumers begin to “read,” “order” or “pin,” they deepen their interactions with brands. The longer the heritage, the more creative marketers can be in developing ways for millennials to experience the brand. For example, imagine Coca-Cola‘s nearly 40 million “likes” redefined as “refreshed,” or millennials “drinking” a Coke in 1892 after visiting that segment of the timeline.

What steps must CMOs take before plunging into timeline?

  • Craft the brand story. Make sure your core story is quick to understand, easy to remember, emotional and inviting of participation.

  • Be transparent. Every brand has a past, and given the ease with which millennials can discover skeletons in the closet through the internet, it’s important to disclose painful history and how the brand dealt with it. Otherwise the backlash could be severe.

  • Tap millennials within your marketing organization. Smart CMOs are complimenting their traditional marketing acumen with adept millennials.

    While it is too early to know exactly how the Facebook brand timeline will connect with the market, we believe the principles we’ve outlined will prepare heritage-brand CMOs to capitalize on the seismic shift about to occur on one of the world’s largest marketing platforms.

    ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    The authors lead the Technology Practice at Makovsky & Co., a public relations firm. Mr. Makovsky is assistant VP and Mr. Wolfrom is exec VP.
  • Facebook Shakes Hardware World With Own Storage Gear | Wired Enterprise

    Facebook’s hardware team is now building storage gear — while decorating the walls at the company’s new HQ in Menlo Park, California. Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired.com

    Facebook already built its own data center and its own servers. And now the social-networking giant is building its own storage hardware — hardware for housing all the digital stuff uploaded by its more than 845 million users.

    “We store a few photos here and there,” says Frank Frankovsky, the ex-Dell man who oversees hardware design at Facebook. That would be an understatement. According to some estimates, the company stores over 140 billion digital photographs — and counting.

    Like the web’s other leading players — including Google and Amazon — Facebook runs an online operation that’s well beyond the scope of the average business, and that translates to unprecedented hardware costs — and hardware complications. If you’re housing 140 billion digital photos, you need a new breed of hardware.

    In building its own data center on the Oregon high desert, Facebook did away with electric chillers, uninterruptible power supplies, and other terribly inefficient gear. And in working with various hardware manufacturers to build its own servers, the company not only reduced power consumption, it stripped thee systems down to the bare essentials, making them easier to repair and less expensive. Frankovsky and his team call this “vanity free” engineering, and now, they’ve extended the philosophy to storage hardware.

    “We’re taking the same approach we took with servers: Eliminate anything that’s not directly adding value. The really valuable part of storage is the disk drive itself and the software that controls how the data gets distributed to and recovered from those drives. We want to eliminate any ancillary components around the drive — and make it more serviceable,” Frankovsky says during a chat at the new Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, which also happens to be the former home of onetime hardware giant Sun Microsystems.

    “Break fixes are an ongoing activity in the data center. Unfortunately, disk drives are still mechanical items, and they do fail. In fact, they’re one of the higher failure-rate items. So [we want to] be able to quickly identify which disk has failed and replace it, without going through a lot of mechanical hoops.”

    As with its data center and server creations, Facebook intends to “open source” its storage designs, sharing them with anyone who wants them. The effort is part of the company’s Open Compute Project, which seeks to further reduce the cost and power consumption of data center hardware by facilitating collaboration across the industry. As more companies contribute to the project, the thinking goes, the designs will improve, and as more outfits actually use the designs for servers and other gear — which are manufactured by Facebook partners in Taiwan and China — prices will drop even more.

    When Facebook first introduced the project last spring, many saw it as a mere PR stunt. But some big-name outfits — including some outside the web game — are already buying Open Compute servers. No less a name than Apple has taken interest in Facebook’s energy-conscious data-center design. And according to Frankovsky, fifty percent of the contributions to the project’s open source designs now come from outside Facebook.

    For Peter Krey — who helped build a massive computing grid for one of Wall Street largest financial institutions and now advises the CIOs and CTOs of multiple Wall Street firms as they build “cloud” infrastructure inside their data centers — Facebook’s project is long overdue. While building that computing grid, Krey says, he and his colleagues would often ask certain “tier one” server sellers to strip proprietary hardware and unnecessary components from their machines in order to conserve power and cost. But the answer was always no. “And we weren’t buying just a few servers,” he says. “We were buying thousands of servers.”

    Now, Facebook has provided a new option for these big name Wall Street outfits. But Krey also says that even among traditional companies who can probably benefit from this new breed of hardware, the project isn’t always met with open arms. “These guys have done things the same way for a long time,” he tells Wired.

    Hardware by Committee

    Facebook will release its new storage designs in early May at the next Open Compute Summit, a mini-conference where project members congregate to discuss this experiment in open source hardware. Such names as Intel, Dell, Netflix, Rackspace, Japanese tech giant NTT Data, and motherboard maker Asus are members, and this past fall, at the last summit, Facebook announced the creation of a not-for-profit foundation around the project, vowing to cede control to the community at large.

    The project began with Facebook’s data center and server designs. But it has since expanded to various other sub-projects, and the contributors include more than just web companies. Rackspace contributes, but so does financial giant Goldman Sachs.

    Rackspace is leading an effort to build a “virtual I/O” protocol, which would allow companies to physically separate various parts of today’s servers. You could have your CPUs in one enclosure, for instance, your memory in another, and your network cards in a third. This would let you, say, upgrade your CPUs without touching other parts of the traditional system. “DRAM doesn’t [change] as fast as CPUs,” Frankovsky says. “Wouldn’t it be cool if you could actually disaggregate the CPUs from the DRAM complex?”

    With a sister project, project members are also working to create a new rack design that can accommodate this sort of re-imagined server infrastructure. A traditional server rack houses several individual machines, each with its own chassis. But the Open Rack project seeks to do away with the server chassis entirely and turn the rack into the chassis.

    Meanwhile, Goldman Sachs is running an effort to build a common means for managing servers spread across your data center. Part of the appeal of the Open Compute Project, says Peter Krey, is that the project takes a “holistic approach” to the design of data center hardware. Members aren’t designing the data center separately from the servers, and the servers separately from the storage gear. They’re designing everything to work in tandem. “The traditional data center design…is Balkanized,” Krey says. “[But] the OCP guys have designed and created all the components to efficiently integrate and work together.”

    This began with Facebook designing servers specifically for use with the revamped electrical system built for its data center in Prineville, Oregon. And soon, the effort will extend to the storage gear as well. Frankovsky provides few details about the new storage designs. But he says his team has rethought the “hot-plug drive carriers” that let you install and remove hard drives without powering a system down.

    “I’ve never understood why hot-plug drive carriers have to come with these plastic handles on them,” he explains. “And if you’ve actually mounted a drive inside one of those drive carriers, there are these little bitty screws that you inevitably lose — and you’ll likely lose one onto a board that’s live and powered. That’s not a good thing.”

    He says that the new design will eliminate not only the screws but the carriers themselves. “It’s a completely tool-less design,” Frankovsky says. “Our techs will be able to grab hold of a ‘slam latch,’ pull it up, and the act of pulling it up will pop the drive out.”

    Frankovsky calls it “small stuff.” And that’s what it is. But if you’re running an operation that size of Facebook, that small stuff becomes very big indeed. In making one small change after another, Facebook is overhauling its infrastructure. And in sharing its designs with the rest of the world, it hopes to overhaul much more.

    Yahoo threatens to sue Facebook over patents – Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal

    Yahoo and Facebook logos

    Yahoo has reportedly demanded that Facebook license some 10 to 20 patents or face legal action.

    Please support our site by enabling javascript to view ads.

    Yahoo Inc.    Yahoo Inc. Latest from The Business Journals Yahoo demands licensing fees from FacebookTwitter CEO coming to Cincinnati for Procter & Gamble eventFlickr pulls pins on Pinterest image sharing Follow this company reportedly wants Facebook Inc.    Facebook Inc. Latest from The Business Journals Yahoo demands licensing fees from FacebookTwitter CEO coming to Cincinnati for Procter & Gamble eventSocial media startups scramble for Facebook ad opportunity Follow this company to pay to license between 10 and 20 patents or face a patent lawsuit.

    The New York Times cited unnamed sources in a story Monday night that said Yahoo (NASDAQ:YHOO) has told the social networking giant that the patents in question involve technologies that include advertising, the personalization of Web sites, social networking and messaging.

    The paper quoted a Yahoo spokesperson as saying, “Yahoo has a responsibility to its shareholders, employees and other stakeholders to protect its intellectual property. We must insist that Facebook either enter into a licensing agreement or we will be compelled to move forward unilaterally to protect our rights.”

    Facebook spokesman Barry Schnitt, however, told The Times, “Yahoo contacted us the same time they called The New York Times and so we haven’t had the opportunity to fully evaluate their claims.”

    It isn’t clear how much Yahoo thinks it is owed by Facebook but the fight comes at a sensitive time for both companies. Facebook is getting ready to go public in the next few months and Yahoo is trying to establish its new identity under recently named CEO Scott Thompson.

    Written by Cromwell Schubarth. Contact him at cschubarth@bizjournals.com or 408.299.1823.

    Yahoo Inc.    Yahoo Inc. Latest from The Business Journals Yahoo demands licensing fees from FacebookTwitter CEO coming to Cincinnati for Procter & Gamble eventFlickr pulls pins on Pinterest image sharing Follow this company reportedly wants Facebook Inc.    Facebook Inc. Latest from The Business Journals Yahoo demands licensing fees from FacebookTwitter CEO coming to Cincinnati for Procter & Gamble eventSocial media startups scramble for Facebook ad opportunity Follow this company to pay to license between 10 and 20 patents or face a patent lawsuit.

    The New York Times cited unnamed sources in a story Monday night that said Yahoo (NASDAQ:YHOO) has told the social networking giant that the patents in question involve technologies that include advertising, the personalization of Web sites, social networking and messaging.

    The paper quoted a Yahoo spokesperson as saying, “Yahoo has a responsibility to its shareholders, employees and other stakeholders to protect its intellectual property. We must insist that Facebook either enter into a licensing agreement or we will be compelled to move forward unilaterally to protect our rights.”

    Facebook spokesman Barry Schnitt, however, told The Times, “Yahoo contacted us the same time they called The New York Times and so we haven’t had the opportunity to fully evaluate their claims.”

    It isn’t clear how much Yahoo thinks it is owed by Facebook but the fight comes at a sensitive time for both companies. Facebook is getting ready to go public in the next few months and Yahoo is trying to establish its new identity under recently named CEO Scott Thompson.

    Written by Cromwell Schubarth. Contact him at cschubarth@bizjournals.com or 408.299.1823.